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of victims in serious condition and they will give us more information. what is interesting the ntsb gave us a time line of the last seven seconds of the crash. the crew anyhow they were going too slow and low. there were a number of indication and tried to abort the landing, the landing gear hit the jetty. and we had a tail section that broke off and the video that continues to come in from amateur videos from cell phones and other ways and means and she a dramatic slamming down and bouncing of the jet. it is amazing that it stayed together. we get first responder stories and everything from two of those inflatable slides that you see on the seat back if you look at the security card. two of those inflated inside of the jet and they had to use an a x to free the people underthem. and exacto comboifs used to cut people out. and so these stories continue to come out. we'll hear about that in the next hour and half. we'll update the conditions. this investigation continues to go forward. they are getting a lot of information. that runway where the fuselage sits is still there. the planes a arr
. >> it wasn't just slow by a few miles an hour, it was sufficient for a small. >> the ntsb told us that at 7 seconds there was a voice in the cockpit that asked to increase speed. at 4 seconds there was a device that shakes the stick which means that the aircraft is on an incipient stall. then at 1.5 seconds to go there were voices in the cockpit that said go around which is an order to go full power and take the aircraft out of danger. we know those actions were given. the question is should she have been given earlier. gregg: the answer is obviously yes. >> in terms of the outcome absolutely. but what we have to unthrough the ntsb is how we came to this position given the most of the approach -- the information we have so far tells us it seems to be fairly stable. the throttles were island and the pilots were making a steady approach. what i would say about sfo is the approach is a fairly complicated approach. the crew would have been fatigued. they would have been coming to a relatively long day and the pilot is given visual flight rules. there is visibility in excess of five miles. but m
of the victims may have been struck by an emergency vehicle responding to the crash and ntsb officials said they have reviewed surveillance footage but do not want to make a conclusion until they examine all of the evidence. for the latest on that developing story and more, we go to claudia cowan, standing by at the san francisco airport. claudia. >> reporter: good evening, eric. a federal investigator has spent the past few hours talking to the pilots and the flight crew and those interviews will be critical, by all accounts, no problems with the airplane until just seconds before it crash landed on saturday. also recovered some of the wreckage that wound up in san francisco bay, including what they are calling a significant piece of the tail, which is believed to have hit the ground first. specifically the seawall at the front edge of the runway. investigators with the national transportation safety board say the landing went from routine to disaster in less than 10 seconds. >> they were cleared to land by the towers. and then there was the accident sequence and the subsequent launch of t
international airport right now. what are we learning from the ntsb, the national transportation safety board, adam? reporter: john, they're confirming what a lot of eyewitnesses said t was coming in low and slow. they gave out basically a timeline that really describes the last seven seconds. everything seemed fine when it was on short final and cleared to land here in san francisco. but seven seconds out the crew first realized they were coming in too slow. over the course of the next seven seconds it evolves to the point where the, the handles shaking the way they fly the plane of course. they tried to abort the landing but it was too late. as a part of that the crew has given a couple of details so far but the ntsb plans on meeting with crew today, speaking with them as well as as the pilots. but earlier today, on fox news channel they were talking about, that talking about the plans for this investigation to go forward by talking with the crew. take a listen. >> so we do want to interview all four of those pilots. we want to understand who was the pilot flying. who was the pilot in comma
on the deadly plane crash in san francisco. we're about to hear what the pilot at the control told ntsb investigators. claudia? >> federal investigators will update the media at the top of the hour and at that point we hope to learn more about their interviews with the pilots as they put together a first hand narrative of what happened and why no one seem to realize there was a problem until it was too late. federal investigators say flight 214 was going between 35 and 40 miles-per-hour slower than it should have been in the final seconds before it crashed. at the pilot had just 43 hours flying experience on the 777 and that saturday's landing was part of his training. what's more, it was the first time the other pilot in the cockpit, who was training him, at ever flown in that capacity. investigators well be working with the head of asiana airlines who just just arrived, and they're working with korean translators to learn more about the pilots beyond just their actions prior to landing. >> we're going to get a lot more details about their activities, about their work, about their trai
of the ntsb will speak about the horrific plane crash in san francisco. two teenagers lost their lives from china. when you look at the condition of the plane, it is hard to believe they survived due to the heroism of the crew and people on the ground. the people were at the controls when the tail of the aircraft slammed in the runway and ripped off over the sea wall and that led to the smoke and scene you saw on the screen. apparently, one of them, one of the pilots had 40 hours of training and guided by a pilot who was on the first day as a trainer. we'll bring you more of the details when we get that in. >> we are waiting for a major decision from the judge in the george zimmerman trial. the ruling yesterday is been cited as a potentially crucial decision in the outcome of this trial. we'll look at how trayvon martin's history of pot use came in to play in the courtroom and what it may mean. and imagine to wake up on the operating room table that you are dead and doctors are talking about harvesting your organs. trace investigating how that happen in a major new york hospital. we'll tell
. >> it is reaable. but saying that i think there will be a focus by the ntsb on the whole issue of crash worthiness. the seats were first recommended in 1988. and for those -- tom of your throughing audience i'm sure saw the devastation from the fire. trying to look at the flappability standard to be shoe when events like this happen the majority of people can walk away alive like they did in this event. martha: there were four pilots on board. they were rotating. they will interview another one of those pilots today. in terms of the slow and low on the descent of this plane, what is your thought? >> fir the issue of automation. as you know, these pilots took off in seoul and did not land the aircraft until san francisco. are we becoming in aviation overly dependent on automation so when we have a situation like this at the san francisco airport with the ils being repaired, that the crews don't have the necessary training to handle the aircraft? martha: this pilot had 42 hours on the triple 7, but he never land a plane at san francisco airport before this day. what do you think of this practice? >
late. meantime ntsb investigators also describe the debris field. >> when you get down to the sea wall, can you identify where the first strike took place. first landing gear impacted the sea wall and then the tail. >> and the head ofation anna airlines arrived in san francisco just a few hours ago and was mobbed by reporters as he was ushered out a back door. he didn't have anything to say today but yesterday described as quote intolerable. media reports that pilot inexperience may have been to blame for this fatal crash. he and other south korean officials will be working with the ntsb as this investigation continues to unfold. shep? >> shepard: claudia, a county coroner says we won't know for two or three weeks the autopsy results of one of the teenage victims. he said those results should show whether an emergency vehicle did in fact strike and kill her after she got off the plane. well, just in tonight, brand new, the new england patriots tight end aaron hernandez reportedly admitted, admitted that he fired the shots that killed his friend. that's just some of what we're learning
, the federal aviation administration is responsible. the ntsb investigates accidents where a separate organization. but the faa does have in country experts and some countries and they may send people to travel to other countries. but they do have to work with their counterparts to make sure standards are upheld. >> bill: sure i'm wondering what the oversight is in the faa and your agency to make sure these guys know what they are doing. let me give you an example, i flew in the 1990s on air vietnam most harrowing experience, ducks walking up and down the plane. it was crazy. i would never get on another vietnam plane back then. i'm sure they have upgraded now it was a dangerous experience. the salvadorian airline during the salvadorian war was crazy some didn't even have radar. when i see a plane crash like this and the guy didn't have much experience on the 7777 even though there were four pilots, weighs in command, that makes me nervous. >> well, i think in all of these accidents we have to look at all of the facts before we reach conclusions. it's just been a couple of days. we do
watching it as you've been airplane for the ntsb news conference, and a trainer is discussing mixed martial arts fighting and the training of george zimmerman. some people came to the stand today to testify that the voice heard screaming on one of the police calls was not that of zimmerman -- was that of george zimmerman. back up, please. the people who did the calling -- the people who were in the courtroom said that it was george zimmerman doing the screaming, and not trayvon martin. the one screaming for -- in the key 9-1-1 call before trayvon martin was killed. the lead detective testified that trayvon martin's own father, at the time, was not so sure. listen. >> i don't know why. >> does he look -- >> i can't see him. i don't want to go out there. i don't know what's going on. >> some of zimmerman's friend were in tears after they heard the call, they testified, but they all gave the same answer. >> yes, definitely georgie. >> and how is it that you know that? >> i just -- i hear it. i hear him screaming. >> i thought it was george. >> tell me why you think that. >> just the tone. >> i
runway will re-open. the wreckage of flight 214 will state out there until ntsb investigators have what they need. >> neil: i imagine that would give other folks passing by the creeps. if it was the pilot and not the plane, it is too soon to say the 777s's are out of the woods and the dreamline are won't be running into the turbulence. too early to tell but what from you heard, what do you think? >> it is early but from all the indications the pilot was -- he had 17 miles straight in final, which means you have 17-miles to set up your landing, seven seconds before the touchdown is the first one anyone noticed the air speed and altitude were too low. there wasn't enough corrective action we know of yet, until the stick shaker goes on and at -- >> what brings the stick shaker on? >> if you are in imminent danger of losing the flight, if you're stalling arings and orderly that's accompanied with the stick pusher to get air speed but they too close to the ground. >> neil: home videos we have seen shows it was obviously very, very low coming in. what was the danger? the traffic tower was tel
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11